Non League Club

Guiseley AFC


About Nethermoor Park
26677524301_2a8e8ef620_zLocated just a short walk from the town centre, railway station and under the take-off flight path of Leeds/Bradford Airport, Nethermoor Park is an intimate Non-League ground that has no pretentions.  It is fairly open one, with three sides being exposed to the often harsh elements. On one side there are two small all-seated stands.. The first was built as a replacement for the old Main Stand in 2009 and sits in the middle of the length of the pitch whilst the second is a little smaller and is situated towards the Railway End.

Opposite a small covered terrace, which is located at the Railway End. This is a simple structure, with a few supporting pillars running across the front of it. On the other side is situated the club house. Both ends are small open standing areas, that are mostly flat or just have one step. There is a decent sized clubhouse in the ground as well as two food-serving areas on either side of the pitch.

How to get to Nethermoor Park
Leave the M62 at junction 28 and take the A653 towards Leeds. After passing the White Rose Shopping Centre on your left, go left where the road forks onto the ring road (A6110). Continue on the A6110 passing underneath the M621, following signs for Bradford (A647). Continue following the ring road for another eight miles, until you reach a roundabout that is the junction with the A65. Take the first exit onto the A65 towards Skipton. Continue on the A65 for four miles and you will reach Nethermoor Park on the right.  There is a large free public car park adjacent to the ground on Netherfield Road as well as street parking around the ground.

Guiseley Railway Station is only a five minute walk away from the ground.  As you come out of the main entrance walk diagonally across the car in front. In-between two car parking areas on the other side of the road, you should see a small pathway that takes you towards a row of terraced houses. Follow this path down to its end and you will come out on the Otley Road. Turn right and the ground is further down on the right hand side.

Admission to Nethermoor Park
Adults £15, Concessions £10, Under 12s Free

Our Last Visit – Guiseley AFC 4 Torquay United 3 – Nethermoor Park – Saturday 30th April 2016
My choice for the later game turned out to be inspired.  Just twenty minutes away on the other side of the runway of Leeds-Bradford Airport, is the small town of Guiseley, famed for being the birthplace of Harry Ramsden and Harry Corbett (he of Sooty and not of Steptoe fame).  They would be hosting Torquay United in a must-win final game of the season.  Even if they could gain a victory, results across the moors at Halifax could still see them relegated.

26138079974_c44c4ab0bd_kIt is fair to say that nearly 2,000 squeezed into the tiny Nethermoor Park ground on the edge of the town, making enough noise to be heard in Lancashire.  They raced into a 3-0 lead in the first half, with Torquay, already safe, mentally on the beach, but then just before half-time Halifax scored.  With Boreham Wood also winning, Guiseley occupied the final relegation spot.  The Torquay fans took to reminding the home fans of the fact that they would be relegated even if they won which pleased the locals no end.

Torquay finally realised they were here to play football in the second half and pulled two goals back, with veteran centre-half Exodus Geohaghon’s long throw-ins causing no end of issues for Guiseley.  The nerves of the home fans were eased when Macclesfield equalised at Halifax but with Torquay always looking dangerous, Guiseley simply had to try to score.  They did but back came Torquay to make it 4-3.  Every time a Guiseley player went to take a throw he’d ask someone in the crowd what the score was at Halifax..”1-1” came the reply. The final whistle blew and the fans invaded the pitch, but there was no cheering just yet.  It was a good two minutes before the cheer hit the stands.  Halifax had drawn, Guiseley had escaped.

26650810632_83abfd584a_kEven as a neutral it was hard not to be caught up in the celebrations.  Having been in this position myself I know the relief it brings, as well as those promises of “never again”.  The fans, the players and the whole club can celebrate for a day or two before the planning has to start on making sure the same thing doesn’t happen again next year.

I’m sure the footballing authorities would much rather have more “traditional” clubs in the Conference Premier such as Kidderminster Harriers, with their nice Football League ground, but it is clubs like Guiseley and Braintree Town who demonstrate you can upset the odds on modest budgets and give every club in the leagues below that you can have the dream.

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